Chelsea

Feature: Ghood Girl

Chelsea
Feature: Ghood Girl

Fashion is one of the most personal ways you can express yourself, and let the world know that this is what you stand for. Founder of Ghood Girl, Lica Mishelle, has designed her style pieces to not only mean what they say, but to say so much more than what is printed. 

 

    Ghood Girl’s shop page is filled to the brim of pieces with trending phrases and empowering anthems. Their hybrid name, ghood, is defined as “when people try to tell you what you can and can’t be based on where you came from . . . but your success proves otherwise.” The brand works to stand against the stereotypes and negative connotations of people who didn’t grow up in white picket fence neighborhoods, and show that you didn’t have to go to private school to still rule the world. Whether you sport the long sleeved “#Blessedt” tee or the “Girls Just Wanna Have Funds” tank, you’re able to sing about your pride without saying anything at all. 

 

    Besides producing fashion with a printed a meaning, Ghood Girl is also working to improve the world of women of color more. With the profits made from selling their shirts, beanies and beyond, they have created initiatives of community service. The current project they have running is to provide mental health care through yoga and spiritual work for women of color to repair the stresses they have faced. 

 

    Ghood Girl is a brand with a message. Although the phrases on their shirts are fun and light, the brand has a bigger purpose than to claim someone as ‘bae.’ Their mission is to eliminate the line of expectation from someone who was raised in a run down neighborhood to another who grew up in an upscale suburb. In the words of Lica, “Embracing where we come from and our cultural upbringing is an asset and not a setback that we need to disassociate ourselves from.”

I’m a strong believer in the law of attraction, which is why I try to radiate only positivity into the universe. What you give out will be returned to you, so I strive to only give my best. My ultimatum in life is to help others. I plan to live through that idea by studying to become a pediatric psychologist, something I’ve been writing down in surveys since age 10.  No matter the occasion or what I’m going through, I always feel a sense of security through writing. I drift towards writing poetry, but can find myself going off for three pages worth of my journal at times as well. The matter of being able to let whats going on inside flow from hand to paper is such a beautiful thing in my opinion.